Embrace the ‘No’

This post is lightly inspired by an image posted by a friend. It was alluding to three important ‘rules’ to live by. I noticed the lack of embracing a no response, so I added it for her.

It is probably leading to a load of confusion for everyone who sees it, so I am going to further explain what I mean in this post to express what I meant!

A no is progress. Of course, I mean this mostly in regards to the arts, mostly because that is where a majority of my experience is.

While I was pitching my book to publishing agents, I loved getting rejection letters. It let me know that they actually took the time to consider my work, and that they just felt like it was not worth their time. It is easy to forget when you are entrenched in a work you have created to remember that agents (both literary and music) make their money being able to sell your work to a bigger label. So, yes: you may have done something amazing for you. You might even have friends and family who think what you have done is amazing; but if the agent cannot sell it, they are going to pass. This doesn’t mean that the work is bad, it just means that the audience doesn’t exist, or the timing is off.

Hell, we all have seen pieces of art that we think are horrible. There are number one singles in the spotlight that we know we could do better than, or books that are boring. There are actors that are just fucking terrible, podcasts that are petty, and blogs (like this one) that are a mess narratively. The only reason they exist is because someone heard the ‘no’ and said ‘MEH’.

When it comes to the arts, it truly is a timing and arrogance game. Luck plays an unfortunately large percent of how things go. I say arrogance because you cannot give up, even if you are feeling like things are too hard. If you have an end goal of making money doing the arts, and your enjoyment is being hampered by your inability to do, the choice has to be made: is the ‘no’ too taxing on your continued enjoyment of the journey?

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